Test2Learn™ team and University of Pittsburgh faculty members Philip Empey (Pharmacy), Mylynda Massart (Family Medicine), James Stevenson (Pharmacy), and Lisa Parker (Center for Bioethics & Health Law) are leading the work as part of a three-year $2.8 million grant from the Richard King Mellon Foundation awarded to the Institute for Precision Medicine.

The goal of this grant is:

  • to accelerate the adoption of genomic testing through high-fidelity genomics education enabled by Test2Learn
  • to enhance genome sequencing for critically ill infants
  • translate precision medicine research to market

Test2Learn is an award-winning educational solution developed by the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy that embraces participatory education.  Learners can go through genetic testing themselves and work with their own data to attain superior learning outcomes.  To date, over 1800 learners have been trained to integrate genetic data into their clinical decision making in one of over 35 Test2Learn programs nationally. 

The new grant focuses on integrating whole genome sequencing data into the Test2Learn platform and developing new training modules to educate at least 140 front-line providers to interpret these new clinical tests.

The University press release can be found here.